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Where In The World Is ISIS Wallet?

June 24th, 2013
With all of the recent attention to Google Wallet, thought it might be interesting to do the same about some of the other digital wallets in the market – there are so many now! Since someone was asking me just the other day about ISIS, and its been a while since we’ve heard from them, I was inspired. So, just Where in the Wallet World is ISIS these days?, asks GuestView Columnist Karen Webster. Well, the short answer is: not in very many places.

It’s live in two cities, so they can officially use plural words when describing its deployment, but unless you live in Salt Lake City or Austin (and own particular handsets with NFC) you are SOL in being able to engage in the ISIS experience. According to Mike Abbott, ISIS CEO, at a presentation this past May, ISIS will expand past those cities when they are good and ready. And after all, what’s the rush, especially when you have Big Daddy Telebucks (AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon) bankrolling you? Let’s take a trip down memory lane now and refresh our collective memories on the ISIS Wallet evolution.Read more...


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Labs Strategy: Why Embracing “Failure” Is A Great Idea But A Horrible Word

June 20th, 2013
Oracle posted a very interesting short thought-piece Wednesday (June 19) about the different ways retail chains do—and should—handle lab strategy. Often labs are pure internal mechanisms, but they are more often the result of a tech acquisition. But the choice of strategies reveals an awful lot about attitudes of senior management. One key point is that management must be willing to accept—and learn from—failures. But if the CEO even thinks of the ultra-valuable data that comes from learning what shoppers will not accept as "a failure," the chain has even bigger problems than it thinks.

By looking at the different choices made by Walmart, Target, Home Depot, Nordstrom, Staples, Tesco, Wet Seal and Lowe's, Oracle categorizes three IT lab approaches. But how a lab is corporately structured will make little difference if senior management isn't willing to first learn (and to pay a lot for those lessons) and to be open to a future that they may not like. The job of a chain is to adapt to the reality in its market. The job of a dying chain is to cling to its current tactics if the future doesn't look like what it wants it to look like.Read more...


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Amazon’s Supply Chain Kicking The SKUs Out Of Walmart’s

June 19th, 2013
After some 19 years of struggling with E-Commerce, Walmart is once again learning that managing a merged channel retail strategy is almost never going to beat a well-run pure-play e-tailer like Amazon when it comes to online sales. Was reminded of this point courtesy of a wonderful stat in a Wall Street Journal story that ran Wednesday (June 19), which compared Amazon and Walmart's supply chain costs: "Wal-Mart's online shipping can cost $5 to $7 per parcel, while Amazon averages $3 to $4 per parcel, analysts say—a big difference considering some of Wal-Mart's popular purchases are low-cost items like $10 packs of underwear."

There are many factors behind those numbers, but it really comes down to the fact that Walmart's massive global supply chain needs to support more than 4,000 physical stores—a feat that Amazon need not worry about. Given that huge physical burden, Walmart's costs are quite impressive. But no one ever said that fighting against a pure play was particularly fair. Like all major chains, Walmart initially had two choices. Run the chain as one big happy merged channel family or separate and run online and offline as separate companies. Neither approach is perfect.Read more...


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Cyberthieves Are Going Low-Tech, And The Only Way To Stop Them May Be To Go Even Lower

June 18th, 2013
At a time when retail IT is getting better at locking down just about every avenue cyberthieves have of breaking in—PINpads, wireless networks, connections with processors—it's nice to know the bad guys are still able to hit retail security where it isn't. (OK, it's not nice, but you know what we mean.) According to FICO (NYSE:FICO), scammers are now using a decidedly low-tech technique for stealing payment-card information from consumers—and there's no special reason the same trick won't work against store employees for the keys to a retail network.

It works like this: A cyberthief phones the target claiming to be from a bank and saying there's been suspicious activity on the target's card. If the target doesn't trust the caller, the thief encourages the target to phone the bank using a number the target trusts. The target hangs up—but the thief doesn't. When the target picks up the phone again to dial, the thief plays a recording of a dial tone. The target dials, but it's the thief who fields the call. From that point, it's all Social Engineering 101.Read more...


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For Fraud And Trust, A Powerful Reminder That Retail Reality And Perception Are Light-Years Apart

June 17th, 2013
A new insurance company survey's shopper perception figures detail what, in the shopper's perception, constitutes a breach. Let's say a major chain has been breached. Standard bank procedure these days is to change the numbers for all payment cards that had been recently used at—or on file with—that retailer. Given the number of recent breaches—and the millions of customers who collectively received such a notice—that's a lot of shoppers who might think they had been personally breached. But they need to ask the question: Did the bank detect any purchases that seemed fraudulent? If the answer is no, then that shopper did not personally experience fraudulent use of their personal information to make purchases without consent. At best, they were mildly inconvenienced because someone else suffered such fraud, but they didn’t.

As a practical matter, though, very few consumers would bother (or even know) to ask such a question. They hear their bank say that their card is being re-issued due to something fraud-like. If a survey asks whether they have personally experienced fraud, they're almost certainly going to say yes. For retailers, this is a very key problem.Read more...


Best Buy’s Online CRM Move: Focus On Why Conversion Rate Is Low

June 14th, 2013
Best Buy is trying to push its substantial in-store CRM program to help its online conversions. Although a noble effort, it's a difficult challenge, trying to get shoppers to not merely change their behavior but also how they envision each channel. At more than 40 million accounts, Best Buy has one of the largest CRM programs in retail. But many of those accounts, of course, are dormant and date from long before the chain's current challenges. They come from a time when the site was seen as little more than a digital directory of the physical stores' SKUs, a place to do some research before heading out to the store.

These days, it's just as likely for shoppers to use the Best Buy site as a way to explore products before buying them at another physical store or a rival's Web site. In effect, the Best Buy site is becoming a showroom for other e-tailers.Read more...


A Clever Way To EAS Protect High Heels

June 13th, 2013

High heels present some interesting LP challenges. Not only are they easily slipped on and off without the need for a monitored dressing room, but they need to be tried on in the store, which can make typical security tags counterproductive. At the NRF Loss Prevention Conference show in San Diego on Wednesday (June 12), Tyco Retail rolled out a new EAS approach.

Tyco’s heel-friendly approach? The tag connects to the back of the heel, with an adjustable knob for different shoe styles. In theory, this shouldn’t damage the product. Tyco argues that although many shoes “have buckles, eyelets, etc, that allow retailers to easily attach” an EAS tag, a “wide variety of women’s pumps and men’s loafers don’t have a convenient place to hook an EAS tag.” As long as the thief doesn’t have a high magnetic detacher, Tyco suggests it should be difficult to remove the tag. Then again, this is a thief, after all. Hopefully she doesn’t simply steal the store’s—or some other store’s—detacher.


Google Wallet’s Osama Bedier Confirms That Google Lost Money With Every Transaction. (Good News: It Didn’t Get Many.)

June 11th, 2013

Osama Bedier, the former PalPal exec who took over Google Wallet (and is now about to become a former Google exec as well),

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has confirmed what most suspected: that the fees Google had to agree to pay to the card brands meant that it lost money on every transaction. (Good news for Google: It didn’t make very many transactions.) “The company has dedicated hundreds of developers to Wallet and spent about $300 million to acquire digital payment startups to help develop the app. But consumers aren’t sold,” reported BusinessWeek. “Wallet has been downloaded fewer than 10 million times in the two years since its launch, according to Play, Google’s app store.”

Google’s initial plans were not about making revenue directly from transactions, but to instead collect data and then sell targeted ads, a very familiar Google model. But what got short shrift was finding a way to get shoppers to use its app. Unlike the Web where it had a very robust search engine to draw in consumers, its mobile wallet was entirely dependent on retailers and payment players to promote it to shoppers, something that no one (other than Google) had much of an incentive to do. And with losses as extreme as the ones Google was facing, adding a lot of marketing dollars …


JCPenney CTO Kristen Blum Gone, IT Transition Questions Remain

June 5th, 2013
JCPenney CTO Kristen Blum, who was hired to execute the IT side of former CEO Ron Johnson's grand vision for the 1,100-store chain, is out. The retailer confirmed on Wednesday (June 5) that Blum is gone with the standard thank-her-and-wish-her-well statement. But what's left in her wake is a set of questions about how JCPenney will deal with a massive IT overhaul that it can't really afford but may not be able to reverse.

Let's be clear: None of that uncertainty was Blum's fault. The decision to rip out 500 legacy systems and replace them with Oracle came from Johnson and former COO Michael Kramer. Kramer was the exec who ripped into the chain's culture and called its systems and IT infrastructure "a mess" last year. Blum's job was to retire systems, streamline processes and push forward into Oracle—and she reportedly managed to do that without creating nearly as many enemies as some of Johnson and Kramer's executive hires.Read more...


Target Quietly Running Four Fulfillment Trials, But The Reason Why Is Far More Interesting

June 5th, 2013
Target CFO John Mulligan has confirmed that Target is in the middle of not one but four different fulfillment pilots, including acting as a guinea pig for the same-day-delivery trials of both Google and EBay. The other Target trials involve pay-online-pickup-in-store, pay-in-store-pickup-at-another-store and pay-online-ship-from-store.

The interesting background to these trials is that Target—as its name implies—has always been precisely focused. These trials, as the CFO pointed out, are the chain admitting that many fundamental shopper assumptions may no longer be valid. "We spent 50 years honing, moving products one direction to our supply chain and ultimately to the back door of the store. Then through the front door and trying to do that as quickly as possible. Now we're moving product different directions depending on what our guest wants and for us, we need to learn how to operationalize that," Mulligan said.Read more...


Grocery Loyalty Actually Lost Members From 2010 To 2012

June 4th, 2013
What happens to CRM when loyalty programs hit a wall? Grocery chains may be about to find out. After years of steady growth, memberships in U.S. grocery chain loyalty programs fell by about 1 percent between 2010 and 2012, according to the 2013 Colloquy Loyalty Census. Yes, total membership really did shrink, from 173.7 million in 2010 to 172.4 million in 2012.

In practical terms, that's not exactly falling off a cliff. But loyalty programs have been growing at a rate that means memberships would double every decade. If your CRM plans were based on needing the processing power to handle all those extra members' data, it's time to adjust those plans.Read more...


The Case Of The Walmart Drunk: Big Data, Big Duties, Big Headaches

May 30th, 2013
Walmart was very recently sued by a woman involved in a car accident. The driver of the car that hit her wasn’t a Walmart employee, it wasn’t a Walmart vehicle, and it didn’t happen in a Walmart parking lot. Rather, the victim alleged that the driver had recently been in a Walmart and had been kicked out for being drunk. The victim alleged that Walmart, knowing that its customer was both drunk and driving, had a duty to prevent the customer from driving, or to report that person to the police. The court considering the case refused Walmart’s efforts to have the case dismissed on summary judgment, finding that there was at least enough evidence of "negligence" to allow the case to go forward.

Even though nobody alleges that Walmart got the patron drunk, the idea is that Walmart was in a position to know about the potential harm and could have stopped it. Here’s where technology makes things messy. Once the drunk is tossed out of the Walmart, there’s a good argument that Walmart’s duty to third parties ends. Unfortunately, Walmart has installed and routinely monitors parking lot cameras. That's where data creates legal duty.Read more...


Walmart: Settlement ‘Worse Than Losing’

May 29th, 2013
In a last-minute interchange settlement objection filed on Tuesday (May 28), Walmart and more than 60 other retailers described the proposed settlement as worse than actually losing the case. The settlement will block future lawsuits over Visa and MasterCard rules, practices or actions—and that includes PCI and breach penalties.

That goes far beyond the original lawsuit, which only covered default interchange rules, honor-all-cards rules and anti-steering rules. If the case went to trial and lost every claim, that would still just lock in the card brands' control of interchange and card-acceptance rules. But the proposed settlement would go far beyond that—extending to block any challenge to PCI and breach penalties.Read more...


Walmart Asked CA Shoppers For Zip Codes. Now It’s Ordered To Send Them Apology Giftcards

May 29th, 2013

What’s the big deal with a retailer asking for Zip Codes in states where such things are frowned upon? Walmart (NYSE:WMT) this week finalized a federal court settlement that will have it sending $25 giftcards to 519 shoppers who were asked for their Zip Codes. It will also be sending $3,500 checks to other shoppers who acted

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as class representatives in a class-action lawsuit, not to mention about $369,000 to the Consumer Federation of California and about $369,000 to the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse. And don’t forget the $420,000 check to pay the legal fees and court costs of the attorneys for the shoppers.

And, yes, we do have to point out that out of all those fees, the lawyers get the biggest check and the shoppers get the smallest.…


Saks Makes Some Curious Tablet Choices When Upgrading Its Flagship Store

May 29th, 2013
Trying to boost Saks Fifth Avenue's flagship store—which Citigroup reported has underperformed the chain's store-revenue average for three of the last four quarters—the retailer has turned to iPads and some old-fashioned customer service improvements. But the chain has made some curious tablet deployment choices. The first move, which should be applauded, is equipping associates with the devices to try and show the hypothetical "single view of the shopper" through multiple channels. So if a shopper routinely logs in—and logs in with the same ID—in all channels, that customer's data could be accurate, assuming an associate is able to nonchalantly ask for the shopper's full ID. It's an ideal step in the right direction.

But Saks, according to Citi, is only deploying one iPad for every three associates. That suggests some 66 percent of associates either won't have a tablet to help their customers or they will have to awkwardly borrow one from another associate. But one associate can't borrow a tablet from another associate who is working with a customer, so an idle associate will have to be located. On a busy Saturday afternoon, that could be almost impossible. Does Saks really want some of its associates to have tablet-powered capabilities while others do not? Will some shoppers be at a disadvantage? Wasn't the whole point of tablets that their pricepoint is such that it's economical for every floor associate to have one while they are actively working the floor?Read more...


What You’re Missing: Urban Outfitters Charging More Online, Does Sears Want To Go Members-Only?

May 29th, 2013

Your friends here at StorefrontBacktalk editorial also now publish a daily retail site, called FierceRetail, and wanted to give you a sense of what you’re missing by not visiting or grabbing its free newsletter. Urban Outfitters discovers that it can get away with charging more online than in-store. See? Sometimes conventional wisdom is conventionally wrong.

A look into how federal judges are likely to force changes in how price anchors are set in-store plus some questions about whether Sears is thinking about becoming members-only. Was Best Buy’s Facebook promo a victim of its own great deal—and some we-should-have-seen-this-coming rip-off artists? We also threw in our take on Walmart’s $82 million hazardous waste settlement, where Walmart spoke of mouthwash and hairspray and the feds said they were pesticides. (You say tomato, I say Molotov cocktail…) All of that—and dozens more stories—and that was just this week. And Monday was a holiday! Drop by and check it out. It’s free and the snacks all have zero calories. (That may be because they don’t exist.)…


Walmart’s Auto Shopping List: The Next Killer Mobile App?

May 29th, 2013
Gibu Thomas, the SVP for mobile/digital at Walmart, recently floated the idea of a mobile shopping app that uses POS and CRM files to prepopulate a shopping list, filling it with things that the customer is likely to run out of very soon. At a glance, this may seem like a throwaway idea his team is toying with. But for quite a few reasons, this seemingly innocuous functionality idea could truly be the killer app that retailers often strive for.

The idea, which Thomas made a passing reference to during a keynote speech at CTIA Wireless, was referenced this way: "The best shopping list is the one you don't have to create and that's what we're working on." (Technically, the best shopping list is the one that someone else has to shop and pay for, but I digress.) Presumably, this mobile app would be built atop the chain's experimental Scan & Go mobile app, which prepares in-aisle checkout leveraging existing self-checkout units. Given that Scan & Go—by its very nature—requires the shopper to register beforehand and to be associated with a verified payment method, it delivers an ideal CRM platform. This is a nice backdoor way to get into CRM for Walmart, which doesn't have a traditional CRM program and never has had one. That is a crucial element of Thomas' self-populating shopping list.Read more...


Hispanic Shoppers Tend To Be Younger And To Crave Mobile More, Report Says, But Taking Wise Action From That Data Is A Lot Trickier Than It Seems

May 29th, 2013
A new study finds that Hispanic shoppers are more likely than their non-Hispanic counterparts to use mobile and that's partially because the average Hispanic shopper today is 10 years younger. The report from the Integer Group also suggests that Hispanic customers are more likely to embrace mobile's interactive capabilities with friends and family—and to do so in greater numbers.

Like many reports, the statistics here do not strongly support the report's conclusions. The report found that "16 percent of Hispanic shoppers are using their mobile device to make purchases compared to 12 percent of general market shoppers" and the report had a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points, making such a distinction razor-thin at best. But the group has done enough reports in this area and has found this distinction consistently shows up when doing head-to-head comparisons. Martin Ferro, a senior account planner for Integer and one of the researchers of the report, said the differences make sense given what he has seen in other reports about U.S. Hispanic shoppers. "They are for sure younger. It's really the new generation of (Hispanics) that are U.S.-born," Ferro said. "They tend to be the very early adopters of mobile technology. Besides the youth, the culture is a lot more comfortable with connectivity."Read more...


Mobile Point Of Sale Is Growing Fast And Turning Up Surprises

May 22nd, 2013
Use of tablets and iPods as point-of-sale devices is growing rapidly, but it's not going to knock cashwraps out of most stores anytime soon, according to an IHL Group report released Tuesday (May 21). More than 85 percent of big retailers say that for the next three years, mobile POS devices will be add-ons to—not replacements for—traditional fixed checkouts.

The most likely users of those devices: specialty retailers (both mall-based specialty chains and small independents), who are deploying about 45 percent of all tablets shipped to retail for POS, IHL said. But only 28 percent of U.S. retailers plan to roll out any mobile POS devices by the end of 2013, a drop from previous estimates. That suggests the reality of mobile POS is beginning to set in for early adopters, who are beginning to see some of the limits—and counterintuitive aspects—of the technology.Read more...


Nordstrom Halts Mobile Customer-Tracking Trial

May 21st, 2013
Eight months into a controversial customer-tracking mobile trial, Nordstrom (NYSE:JWN) has halted the effort. Although Nordstrom took a lot of criticism for the mostly misunderstood program from consumer media, it's not clear whether the project ended as a result of the criticism or the trial had simply run its course. The trial's purpose was straightforward: to use routine signals coming from shopper's mobile devices to count how many people showed at Nordstrom and, critically, which were repeat visitors (and, if so, how many times they had previously visited, dates they visited and where in the store they went). Nordstrom had maintained that it was only seeing anonymous data, meaning that it didn't know the names of the shoppers being tracked.

The trial was controversial for a reason other than consumers' fears that their privacy was somehow being invaded.The problem is that Euclid was able to see cross-retail activity. That means that it saw when, for example, a Nordstrom shopper left Nordstrom without visiting POS and then her mobile signal appeared 20 minutes later inside Macy's, where she ended her visit with that always-desired visit to POS. (Note: That was just an example. Other than Nordstrom, we're not identifying which retailers are using Euclid.) The fact that Nordstrom is only receiving anonymous data (or so it says) doesn't mean that its rivals all are similarly limited. This is a key industry problem with many forms of mobile information gathering. Read more...


Marks & Spencer’s POS Charges Contactless Regardless, At Least Now And Then

May 21st, 2013
Some Marks & Spencer customers have reported that the U.K. chain's contactless payment terminals have taken money from contactless cards even when those cards were still in purses or wallets a foot or more away—and in at least one case, the grabby POS behavior was repeatable.

The retailer recently rolled out contactless point-of-sale terminals to 644 U.K. stores and reportedly processes more than 230,000 contactless transactions every week. But several customers told the BBC that they had the experience of inserting a chip-and-PIN card in the PINpad's slot, but being issued a receipt for a contactless card that was nowhere near the PINpad. The contactless system isn't supposed to work at distances of more than about two inches.Read more...


How Victoria’s Secret, Nordstrom Came To Opposite Decisions

May 21st, 2013
Sometimes, doing the right thing can mean saying no to what shoppers might think is the right thing. Victoria's Secret (NYSE:LTD) recently found itself in the middle of a challenging issue when the daughter of a breast cancer survivor started campaigning vigorously—including helping to get 120,000 signatures on a petition—to get the apparel retailer to start offering mastectomy bras.

The truth is that Victoria's Secret has been a longtime champion of cancer issues, having donated more than $1.6 million to the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation and the American Cancer Society to fund breast cancer research, education, screening and treatment. It’s also donated some $10 million (over two years) to fund cancer research at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center. But the company was in the awkward position of knowing that it couldn't do mastectomy bras in the proper way. Read more...


Fighting Falling Same-Store Sales, Walmart Looks To Be Saved By IT

May 17th, 2013
As Walmart was reporting its first same-store sales drop in seven quarters along with a barely increasing profit on Thursday (May 16), it also detailed its impressive IT and e-commerce growth. Quarterly online sales soared more than 30 percent as the chain kept boosting its number of self-checkout POS units (a 38 percent boost in that quarter alone). "Customer response (to self-checkout) has been positive, with utilization across the chain up more than 300 basis point years over year," reported Bill Simon, Walmart's senior U.S. executive. And even while reports continue that Walmart staff cutbacks are slowing down its ability to stock its shelves in a timely manner, Simon spoke of using IT magic to improve efficiency and get those shelves loaded again.

"In the back rooms, projects like MyGuide and OneTouch also enabled improvements in stocker productivity by helping to facilitate the process of moving merchandise from the truck to the shelf and prioritizing work for our associates," Simon said. "In the first quarter, these initiatives contributed to an increase of more than 3 percent cases handled per work hour."Read more...


The Myth Of Showrooming Takes Another Hit

May 15th, 2013
The myth of showrooming—the suggestion that tons of shoppers are flooding stores to only use them as a physical showroom as they had always intended to purchase the product at Amazon—lives on. But a survey conducted in late April by Bizrate Insights is helping to add a little clarity. First, showrooming really doesn't happen very often. But more interestingly, when it does, it's more likely to be within the same chain. That's a problem all right, but the name of that problem isn't showrooming. It's internal politics.

Bizrate surveyed more than 9,000 shoppers (between April 24-30) who had just completed an online purchase at one of their e-tailers. The first—and arguably most meaningful—stat is an overwhelming 78.15 percent of those online purchasers had not looked at those products in any physical store. No surprise there, but it's a key number to remember the next time someone shouts about how showrooming is gutting brick-and-mortars. When they zeroed in on that remaining 21.85 percent of shoppers who had looked instore before buying online, most of them (54 percent) ended up buying from the same chain.Read more...


PayPal Offers Free Card Processing, But For Who?

May 15th, 2013
PayPal is offering free credit, debit, check and PayPal processing for qualifying merchants until the end of 2013. The catch: The retailer has to trade in a cash register for a PayPal-compatible point-of-sale system, according to a blog post by PayPal president David Marcus on Tuesday (May 14). The promotion will go live in June, although applications are being accepted now, Marcus wrote. He didn't give any other details of the deal, such as how much trade-in value a retailer will get in order to buy a PayPal-equipped POS from Erply, Leapset, Leaf, NCR Silver, ShopKeep or Vend, or exactly what "free" means when it comes to processing costs.

But to qualify for the promotion, merchants currently must be primarily using an old-fashioned system such as a cash register, and PayPal may send out employees to collect the register and verify the system upgrade.Read more...


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