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Apple Drops Amazon “App Store” Lawsuit, Now That Everyone Knows What The Real App Store Is

Written by Frank Hayes
July 10th, 2013

Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) has given up its fight with Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) over app stores—specifically, its trademark lawsuit over the name “App Store” for an online store where customers can buy apps. All Things D reported this week that on Tuesday (July 9), after months of settlement talks, Apple finally asked the judge in the case to dismiss the two-year-old lawsuit. There wasn’t much explanation—an Apple spokeswoman grandly pointed to

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900,000 apps and 50 billion downloads, while Amazon just said it was relieved the legal ordeal was finally over.

But it’s not really such a mystery. In March 2011, when Apple filed its lawsuit, the iPad was less than a year old and the Kindle, introduced in November 2007, looked like a better-established competitive threat. (And it was, just not to the iPad.) Two years later, the iPad is a solid winner, the lawsuit is a waste of money, and the whole thing probably looks silly even to the Apple executives who helped gin it up. A name, however generic it sounds, can be a critical success factor for an unfamiliar element of E-Commerce—but once customers figure it out, they don’t need the name any more. Now will somebody please explain that to the

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Very Large Retailer (based in Bentonville) that owns the trademark Site to Store?


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One Comment | Read Apple Drops Amazon “App Store” Lawsuit, Now That Everyone Knows What The Real App Store Is

  1. Regina Schroeder Says:

    You say App Store, I say Appstore. Apple has decided to call the whole thing off, and has dropped its lawsuit against Amazon for infringing on its trademark for its digital software retail distribution service — see how much easier it is to just say app store? Apple’s lawyers have decided that they don’t need a court to tell them that combining “app” and “store” does not make a unique and distinguishable brand, and that it’s a lost cause to keep people from referring to a store that sells apps as an app store.

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